GSLV Success Fuelled Ascent of K Sivan To Top Job At ISRO

GSLV Success Fuelled Ascent of K Sivan To Top Job At ISRO

K Sivan knew the launch vehicle deeply, and was known among his colleagues as a workaholic who never rested till he finished a project

by Hari Pulakkat

BANGALORE: K Radhakrishnan, former chairman of the Indian Space Research Organisation (ISRO), remembers the end of 2010 as among the most critical period during his tenure at the helm.

Two successive

Read more...

ISRO Releases First Image Captured By Cartosat-2 Series

ISRO Releases First Image Captured By Cartosat-2 Series

ISRO released an image of a part of Indore with Holkar Cricket Stadium in the centre. The image was captured by the satellite on Monday. Cartosat-2 series is the primary satellite carried by PSLV-C40 on Jan 12

CHENNAI: The Indian Space Research Organisation (ISRO) on Tuesday released the first image captured by Cartosat-2 series satellite, four

Read more...

An Explosion That D’t Happen

An Explosion That D’t Happen

A failure analysis has found the Pyro devices (that trigger a small, controlled explosion to snap some parts) in the rocket's heat shield had malfunctioned. Director of Vikram Sarabhai Space Centre and ISRO chairman-designate K Sivan chaired the failure analysis committee. PSLV-C39, the heat shield protects satellites they carry from atmospheric

Read more...

Why It Makes Sense For India’s Private Sector To Venture Into Space?

Why It Makes Sense For India’s Private Sector To Venture Into Space?

The private sector needs to be liberalised from government monopoly in space

Subba Rao Pavuluri - CMD and Founder of Ananth Technologies Limited

Why It Makes Sense For India’s Private Sector To Venture Into Space?Private companies can and should actively work for furthering developments in the space sector.

A company like ours has been successfully working in the realm of space for over 25 years. India has expertise

Read more...

ISRO Used Upgraded PSLV Rocket Today

ISRO Used Upgraded PSLV Rocket Today

A close view of the fourth stage of PSLV - C40 on the launch pad before takeoff

The heat shield in the previous PSLV - C39 mission did not separate from the fourth stage and both the stage and the IRNSS-1H satellite got trapped within the heat shield and could not be injected into space. However, the PSLV - C39 rocket comprising of both solid and

Read more...

K Sivan: A Humble Farmer's Son's Journey To ISRO Top Job

K Sivan: A Humble Farmer's Son's Journey To ISRO Top Job

He joined ISRO in 1982 in PSLV project and contributed immensely towards end to end mission planning, mission design, mission integration and analysis

KANYAKUMARI/CHENNAI: A humble son of a farmer who studied in local government schools in Tamil medium at Kanyakumari district of Tamil Nadu is now all set to helm India's premier Space agency ISRO.

K

Read more...

ISRO's satellite worries Pak

Once bitten twice shy. This is what led India to have an eye in the sky. The Kargil misadventure by Pakistan convinced India that Islamabad could no longer be left unwatched. it, this time from the heavens.

Pakistan media is worried that India is taking rapid strides in space technology with robust investment. in his weekly address yesterday said that "such pursuits" should not be "directed towards a buildup or destabilizing military capabilities.

This can "negatively impact the regional strategic stability", he said while acknowledging that "all space technologies, including earth observation satellites, are inherently dual use and can be employed for both civilian and military purposes.

But, then, India is already keeping a watch on Pakistan for few years. This is believed to have prevented a recurrence of Kargil like situation along the borders.

Soon after partition, Pakistan Army mapped a plan to capture Kashmir. A war began and halted without pushing the Pakistan Army back to its territories. Another war happened in 1965 followed by one more six years later.

During the 1971 war, India came to know about the importance of space technology in devising military plans. that the USSR had sent its submarines in support of India. But Indian space programme was in nascent phase at that time.

Kargil incursion by Pakistan took India by agonizing surprise. India had no clue that Pakistani Army had come well inside its territories and stood there for months. This served as the final reminder and warning to India that Pakistan must be watched over.

In a few years' time, the Indian Space Research Organisation (ISRO) launched a series of satellites with capabilities that could be of significant use to the armed forces. CARTOSAT and RISAT came up to give India the capability to keep an eye on Pakistan's activities along the borders.

When India launched RISAT-1 in 2012, the American space technology experts said that this remote sensing satellite had radar reconnaissance imaging capability that was comparable to that of the most modern versions of the high-flying U-2 spy plane operated by the US Air Force.

With the launch of Cartosat 2E+ in June last year, India considerably enhanced its remote sensing capabilities in space. Cartosat 2E+ was dubbed by many as India's "eye in the sky".

The ISRO today launched its 100th satellite as the PSLV C40 placed 31 satellites from seven countries - including three Indian - across two orbits. The main payload of the PSLV C40 today was the fourth satellite of Cartosat 2 series.

the total number of ISRO satellites that can be used for military purposes has gone up to 14. and can be used to keep an eye on enemies along the land and sea borders.

Don't miss out!

Read more...

India launches 31 satellites successfully

India launches 31 satellites successfully

The Indian Space Research Organisation’s old workhorse the Polar Satellite Launch Vehicle PSLV C-40, 44. metre tall, blasted into a cloudy sky after lifting off from Satish Dhawan Space Centre in Sriharikota, about 110km from Chennai city, around 9:00am and placed all the satellites in two separate orbits in an exercise lasting two hours and 20 minutes.

Addressing the media after the launch, outgoing ISRO chief AS Kiran Kumar said everything went as planned today and that the team was able to put 30 satellites into the orbit, reports our New Delhi correspondent.

Around 17 minutes after the lift-off, the rocket injected its main payload -- the 710kg Cartosat-2 Series, the seventh satellite in the series, into the Polar Sun synchronous orbit at an altitude of about 510km. Within a span of seven minutes, the rocket also ejected 29 nano-satellites into a different orbit as it worked its way up the altitude to 519km.

The Cartosat-2 series satellite will provide regular remote sensing services using its panchromatic and multispectral cameras and images sent by the satellite will be useful for cartographic, urban and rural applications, coastal land use and regulation, utility management like road network monitoring, water distribution, creation of land use maps, change detection to bring out geographical and man-made features and various other land information system as well as geographical information system (GIS) applications.

Today’s successful launch came as a big relief to ISRO scientists as it came four months after their mission to launch backup navigation spacecraft IRNSS-1H onboard rocket PSLV-39 ended in a rare failure on August 31 last year.

In August, the heat shield of the rocket did not separate in the final leg of the launch sequence, trapping the satellite in the fourth stage of the rocket. But that problem did not crop up today.

A visibly relieved and jubilant ISRO Chairman AS Kiran Kumar, who will step down soon, announced that the Cartosat-2 series weather satellite, a nano-satellite and 28 other satellites of France, Canada, Finland, the USA, Britain, South Korea and…. ere successfully injected into the orbit one by one by the PSLV C-40 in the space of about 17. 33 minutes since lift-off.

ISRO is starting 2018 with the successful launch. all customer satellites (besides Cartosat and nanosat) released and the microsat after one hour. So far, Cartosat performance is satisfactory," he said at the ISRO’s mission control room.

ISRO’s chairman-designate K Sivan, who will succeed Kumar, said "we came to the launch pad after four months. Many of our customers came ready with satellites after our previous failure. It shows their confidence in us. We have some exciting launches coming up including Chandrayaan-2, a space mission to the moon.

Indian President Ram Nath Kovind, Vice President M Venkaiah Naidu and Prime Minister Narendra Modi congratulated ISRO for today’s success and called it a moment of pride for every Indian.

Modi said the successful PSLV C-40 mission signifies the ISRO’s achievements as well India’s "bright future" in space programme. e launch by "@isro signifies both its glorious achievements, and also the bright future of India's space programme," he said a tweet.

The Indian PM said the success in the New Year will bring benefits of the country's rapid strides in space technology to citizens, farmers and fishermen. Further, benefits of India's success "are available to our partners," he added.

Out of the 31 Satellites, 28 belonging to six other countries are carried by today's launch," he said in another tweet.

Read more...
Subscribe to this RSS feed